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Welcome to The World's Greatest English Class, where you will find materials, information and guidance to help you succeed in your Language Arts class with Mr. Campbell or Mr. Hannigan, teachers of the World's Greatest English Class.
The contents of this site are © 2006-2014 Tim Campbell and Patrick Hannigan
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AP Language

Rhetoric by Aristotle

The Forest of Rhetoric

Tropes and Schemes

Schemes and Tropes Flashcards

Language Glossary Flashcards

Multiple Choice Practice

Synthesis Essay Example

Released Free Response Prompts

AP's 2013 Essay Scoring Guidelines

Ethos, Pathos, Logos

Games

Rooting Out Words
Grammar Gorilla
Paint by Idiom
The Plural Girls
Scramble-saurus
Stay Afloat
Math Baseball
Match Up
Match each word in the left column with its synonym on the right. When finished, click Answer to see the results. Good luck!

 
Word of the Day

Article of the Day

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Quotation of the Day

Archives

This is the archive for November 2012

Monday, November 12, 2012

A Definition and an Example of Ambiguity

From the

Ambiguity: (1) a statement which has two or more possible meanings;

(2) a statement whose meaning is unclear. Depending on the circumstances, ambiguity can be negative, leading to confusion or even disaster (the ambiguous wording of a general's note led to the deadly charge of the Light Brigade in the Crimean War). On the other hand, writers often use it to achieve special effects, for instance, to reflect the complexity of an issue or to indicate the difficulty, perhaps the impossibility, of determining truth.

The title of the country song "Heaven's Just a Sin Away" is deliberately ambiguous; at a religious level, it means that committing a sin keeps us out of heaven, but at a physical level, it means that committing a sin (sex) will bring heaven (pleasure). Many of Hamlet's statements to the King, to Rosenkrantz and Guildenstern, and to other characters are deliberately ambiguous, to hide his real purpose from them.

Tuesday, November 06, 2012

Learning about gerunds is becoming necessary

Gerund
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

In linguistics, a gerund is a kind of verbal noun that exists in some languages. In today's English, it can behave as a verb within a clause (so that, for example, it may be modified by an adverb or have an object), but the clause as a whole (sometimes consisting only of one word, the gerund) acts as a noun within the larger sentence. For example:
Editing this article is very easy.