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This is the archive for January 2013

Thursday, January 31, 2013

The Symbolism of the Conch


From Wikipedia:

Religion

A Shankha shell (the shell of a Turbinella pyrum, a species in the gastrpod family Turbinellidae) is often referred to in the West as a conch shell, or a chank shell. The shell is used as an important ritual object in Hinduism. The shell is used as a ceremonial trumpet, as part of religious practices, for example puja. The chank trumpet is sounded during worship at specific pointsin the ceremonies, accompanied by bells and singing.

In the story of Dhruva, the divine conch plays a special part. The warriors of ancient India blew conch shells to announce battle, as is described in the beginning of the war of Kurukshetra, in the Mahabharata, the famous Hindu epic.